Did you see the gorilla? The how and the why of gaming trade

Rebecca Harding CEO Coriolis Technologies Over the past two years, the notion that trade has been weaponised has become mainstream thinking. Its weaponisation is rhetorical – we have seen a marked increase in the belligerent language associated with trade. Between the middle of 2017 and the end of 2018, Donald Trump used the word “win” in tweet about trade disputes one in every four days, for example. This is dangerous for the multilateralism that the world has relied on since…

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Did you see the gorilla? The how and the why of gaming trade

Rebecca Harding CEO Coriolis Technologies Over the past two years, the notion that trade has been weaponised has become mainstream thinking. Its weaponisation is rhetorical – we have seen a marked increase in the belligerent language associated with trade. Between the middle of 2017 and the end of 2018, Donald Trump used the word “win” in tweet about trade disputes one in every four days, for example. This is dangerous for the multilateralism that the world has relied on since…

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Future of Strategic Studies: New Speaker Announced

We are delighted to announce Professor Jamie Shea as an after dinner speaker for the Future of Strategic Studies event on the 18th September.  Professor Shea works at the Strategy and Security Institute at the University of Exeter. Prior to joining Exeter, he was an international public servant and a member of the International Staff of NATO for 38 years. His last post was as Deputy Assistant Secretary General for Emerging Security Challenges. 

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Africa: Trade briefing

Harding: 2018 was a disappointing year for trade and economic growth generally, but for Africa in particular. At the outset of 2018 there was a great deal of optimism from the IMF, the World Trade Organisation, and even the International Chamber of Commerce, that trade was beginning to pull away and starting to fuel economic growth globally.  Read More…

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Why the G7 matters to Boris Johnson

Why does the G7 matter? In the recent past, it has been largely a talking shop for the leaders of the world’s biggest economies, who gather for a couple of days before sendingout a communiqué generally agreeing that the western consensus should be maintained, and that globalisation is a good thing socially and economically.   Last year, all that changed. Who will forget the picture of Angela Merkel, surrounded by the leaders of Japan, Canada, the UK, France, Italy and the EU, standing behind a table with both hands forcefully…

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